Inside take on a Folger, Bodleian, and Ransom Center exhibition on the creation and afterlife of the King James Bible on the 400th anniversary of its publication.

Posts tagged “Museum of Biblical Art

Bibles in Battle

New Testament. New York, 1863. American Bible Society. Courtesy of the Museum of Biblical Art.

On April 6 & 7, 1862, opposing Confederate and Union forces met in the woods and fields of rural Tennessee. The ensuing battle would become the bloodiest to date in the United States. Casualties totaled over 23,000 dead and wounded—more than the number killed during all 8 years of the Revolutionary War. Even today, the Battle of Shiloh conjures up images of intense suffering.

For soldiers facing injury, illness, and possible death, the Bible could be a source of comfort. Bibles were distributed with items such as food and blankets by the Sanitary Commission, a relief organization organized to aid Union soldiers. One prisoner of war, Thomas P. Meyer, received a King James Bible while he was held captive at  Belle Island prison in Richmond, Va.  Other soldiers inscribed their names or listed battles in which they had fought inside their copies of the Bible, as this short video from the Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum shows.  The Museum of Biblical Art is currently featuring an exhibition on soldiers’ Bibles from the Civil War to the present day.

While armies fought on the field, orators waged a war of words for public opinion. Two of the most famous abolitionists, Frederick Douglass and  Abraham Lincoln,  both have connections to the King James Bible. A personal copy owned by Douglass is the subject of an earlier post, and Lincoln (and later, President Obama) were sworn in to office on a King James Bible.

Amy Arden assisted in the development and production of the Manifold Greatness website. She is a communications associate at the Folger Shakespeare Library.


The Museum of Biblical Art

The Museum of Biblical Art in New York, NY  is commemorating the 400th anniversary of the King James Bibles with an exhibition, “On Eagles’ Wings: The King James Bible Turns Four Hundred,” that begins today, July 8, and runs through October 16, 2011.  “The exhibition will present the touchstones of the translation process examining how this work was and continues to be inspirational for various audiences over time.” Considering the rich collections of the Museum and the American Bible Society, this exhibition should be excellent.  A unique feature of the exhibition will be a series of paintings by contemporary artist Makoto Fujimura, commissioned for Crossway Publishers’ new edition of the English Standard Version of the Bible.

Tomorrow, July 9, the American Bible Society will host a symposium featuring: Dr. David Norton, Dr. Scot McKnight, Dr. Euan K. Cameron, and Dr. Marlon Winedt. This will be followed by a screening of “KJB: The Book that Changed the World” and a discussion with the film’s director Norman Stone.

Steven Galbraith, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Books, is co-curator of the Manifold Greatness exhibition at the Folger Shakespeare Library.


Arts, crafts, and the KJB

Folger flowers: Papers from the Lada-Mocarski Decorated Paper Collection, Folger Shakespeare Library.

If you follow Manifold Greatness on our Twitter account and  our Facebook page, you already know that the celebration of the King James Bible this 400th anniversary year has taken some creative turns, in everything from drama, music, and art to crafts as ephemeral as flower arranging and scarecrow making.

A quick round-up of some recent highlights reveals—in the last week alone—two new, live-theater productions based on the King James Bible, both in Oxford. A one-night performance at Merton College, University of Oxford, The Full 1611, used lines from every book of the KJB to fashion a 100-minute drama. An Oxford theater troupe, meanwhile, is staging Tales of King James, an original two-actor play, in St. Barnabas Church.

On Wednesday, the King James Bible Trust announced the winning new choral works for its King James Bible Composition Awards, out of eight finalist pieces—both to be aired June 19 on BBC Radio 3’s The Choir: “Out of the South Cometh the Whirlwind,” by Zachary Wadsworth and “The Mystery of Christ,” by Christopher Totney.

In the visual arts, a juried exhibition of modern mosaics on the theme of the King James Bible remains on view through May 30 at Lichfield Cathedral. (In the US, contemporary artist Mako Fujimura has produced a commissioned series of paintings in honor of the King James Bible 400th; they’ll be in the On Eagles’ Wings KJB exhibit, opening in July at New York’s Museum of Biblical Art.)

And, as mentioned, some local crafts are responding to the anniversaryas well. A flower festival in Belfast this weekend marks the anniversary with floral displays evoking Bible verses. Nor is this the only KJB flower arranging this weekend alone; there’s another in Stoke Row. Last week’s Eastwood & Kimberley Advertiser even reported that this year’s scarecrow festival in Underwood included “biblical characters” made by residents “to mark the King James Bible’s 400th anniversary,” although a non-KJB George and the Dragon won the contest. You can see the slingshot-wielding David scarecrow here.